Federal Census

Federal Census

The U.S. Federal Census

The United States has been counting its people since 1790. The population census contains a wealth of information about individuals and about local social and economic conditions at various times in history.

Between 1790 and 1840 U.S. censuses were by head of family only. Beginning in 1850 every individual in the household was counted and described in more or less detail depending upon the prescribed items for that census year. Usually, later censuses required more detailed information.

The censuses between 1790 and 1930 are available for public research. Newer censuses remain confidential for 72 years by law.

Over the last two and a half centuries Warren’s population has fluctuated widely. By 1810 the town’s population had increased to 1100, but with the decline of agriculture and the local iron industry it reached an all-time low in 1930 with only 307 inhabitants.

Today, Warren’s population hovers around 1400.

Warren in the Census

The 1850 census required respondents to provide their name, age, sex, race; whether deaf, dumb, blind, insane, or idiotic; value of real estate; occupation; birthplace; whether married within the year; school attendance; literacy and whether a pauper or convict. In 1850 Warren’s population was 826.

The 1860 census required respondents to provide their name, age, sex, race, value of real estate, value of personal estate, occupation, birthplace; whether married within the year; school attendance; literacy;  whether deaf, dumb, blind, insane, idiotic, pauper or convict; and number of slave houses. In 1860 Warren’s population was 711.

The 1870 census required respondents to provide their name, age, occupation, value of real estate, value of personal estate; birthplace; whether parents were foreign born; month of birth if born within the year; month of marriage if married within the year; school attendance; literacy; whether deaf, dumb, blind, insane, or idiotic; male citizens 21 and over, and number of such persons denied the right to vote for other than rebellion. In 1870 Warren’s population was 671.

The 1880 census required the address and the respondents to provide their name; relationship to family head; sex, race, age, marital status, month of birth if born within the census year; occupation; months unemployed during the year; sickness or temporary disability; whether blind, deaf, dumb, idiotic, insane, maimed, crippled, bedridden, or otherwise disabled; school attendance; literacy; birthplace of person and parents. in 1880 Warren’s population was 635.

The 1890 census was destroyed.

The 1900 census required the address and the respondents to provide their name; relationship to family head; sex, race, age, marital status; number of years married; for women, number of children born and number now living; birthplace of person and parents; if foreign born, year of immigration and whether naturalized; occupation; months not employed; school attendance; literacy; ability to speak English; whether on a farm; home owned or rented and if owned, whther mortgaged. in 1900 Warren’s population was 432.

 

The 1910 census required the address and the respondents to provide their name; relationship to family head; sex, race, age, marital status; number of years of present marriage; for women, number of children born and number now living; birthplace and mother tongue of person and parents; if foreign born, year of immigration, whther naturalized and whether able to speak English, or if not, language spoke; occupation, industry and class of worker; if an employee, whether out of work during year; literacy, school attendance; home owned or rented; if owned, whether mortgaged; whether farm or house; whether a survivor of Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind, deaf or dumb. in 1910 Warren’s population was 422.

The 1920 census required the address and the respondents to provide their name; relationship to family head; sex, race, age, marital status; if foreign born, year of immigration to the U.S., whether naturalized and year of naturalization; school attendance; literacy; birthplace of person and parents; mother tongue of foreign born; ability to speak English; occupation, industry and class of worker; home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged. In 1920 Warren’s population was 348.

The 1930 census required the address and the respondents to provide their name; relationship to family head; home owned or rented; value or monthly rental; radio set; whether on a farm; sex, race, age, marital status, age at first marriage; school attendance, literacy; birthplace of person and parents; if foreign born, language spoken in home before coming to U.S.; year of immigration; whether naturalized and ability to speak English; occupation, industry and class of worker; whether at work previous day [or last regular working day]; veteran status; for Indians whether of full or mixed blood, and tribal affiliation. In 1930 Warren’s population was 307.