Warren was settled in 1737 as part of the Town of Kent.  In 1750 a separate ecclesiastical society called the Society of East Greenwich was established and a church was founded in 1756. In 1786 Warren was incorporated as a separate town.

 

The entrance of the Warren Historical Society.
Please visit us at 7 Sackett Hill Road. The entrance is in the rear of the building.
The office is open from 9 – 12 pm on Mondays and by appointment.

 

Glimpses into Warren’s almost 225 years of history are captured in the museum collection. Photos, objects, diaries and genealogies tell the stories of Warren’s families, homes, business and role in American history.

 

The Brick School and One-Room Schooling
2 PM Sunday,
February 9 at Lower Meeting Room
Town Hall
Read More…

The Brick School also called North School has the distinction of being the single-room schoolhouse with the longest record of continuous operation in the State of Connecticut.

Discover, celebrate and preserve Warren’s History for the benefit of its citizens and surrounding communities through its collections, programs and exhibits.

 

Follow us on Facebook to keep up with our ever changing events and news regarding the Warren Historical Society.

 

Join because you love Warren. Donate because every piece of history we save expands our knowledge of those who came before. Volunteer because it’s the only way you can touch the past and reach the future. Become a member today!

 

Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Are you a stamp collector? Apparently some of our 19th Century Warrenites were real gadabouts. This is a selection of postage stamps from just one family. Do you know where they are from and when they would have been used?
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Do your kids "have nothing to do?" This is a page from a reprint of McGuffey's First Eclectic Reader originally published in 1836. This reader was for First and Second Graders and was innovative in that it was a phonic approach to reading. Notice the phonetic symbols over the vowels indicating if they were long or short. Apparently the average First Grader was supposed to recognize those. Can your children? Can you?
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Here's a real challenge. This map was printed in 1986 as a fundraiser for the Warren Volunteer Fire Company and the Good Neighbor Fund. Take a look at Warren Center. Are the homeowners and business the same? Can you give them their current names? There are a lot of changes in 34 years.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Want to play a guessing game? Can you identify what these tools are or were used for? Post your answers in the Comments.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Are you hungry for something new to do? Why not create a new old recipe in your kitchen?
We're fighting a battle against Covid-19 so here's recipe for War Bread from World War I. One cup of corn meal with one tablespoon of salt into a mixing bowl, pour over enough boiling water water to moisten the mixture, but not to make a batter; when cool add two tablespoons of sugar, two of melted lard or cottolene [brand of shortening made of beef suet and cottonseed oil produced in the United States from 1868 until the early 20th Century], one cup milk (skim milk will do very well), half a cup of water, two and a half cups of rye flour and five teaspoons of baking powder. Beat well, place in a greased loaf pan, smooth over with a wet knife, put in a warm place for 20 minutes, then bake in a moderate over for 50 to 60 minutes.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Discovering hidden history in Warren is a perfect way to practice social distancing. Did you know that it was common practice to burn a house when a household moved? There are numerous cellar holes in Warren for you to explore. Why not take a walk - maybe on your own property - and see what you can discover? Then give us a call or email us and we'll try to help you identify who the householder was?