Warren was settled in 1737 as part of the Town of Kent.  In 1750 a separate ecclesiastical society called the Society of East Greenwich was established and a church was founded in 1756. In 1786 Warren was incorporated as a separate town.

 

The entrance of the Warren Historical Society.
Please visit us at 7 Sackett Hill Road. The entrance is in the rear of the building.
The office is open from 9 – 12 pm on Mondays and by appointment.

 

Glimpses into Warren’s almost 225 years of history are captured in the museum collection. Photos, objects, diaries and genealogies tell the stories of Warren’s families, homes, business and role in American history.

 

The Brick School and One-Room Schooling
2 PM Sunday,
February 9 at Lower Meeting Room
Town Hall
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The Brick School also called North School has the distinction of being the single-room schoolhouse with the longest record of continuous operation in the State of Connecticut.

Discover, celebrate and preserve Warren’s History for the benefit of its citizens and surrounding communities through its collections, programs and exhibits.

 

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Join because you love Warren. Donate because every piece of history we save expands our knowledge of those who came before. Volunteer because it’s the only way you can touch the past and reach the future. Become a member today!

 

Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
The Northeast District is the location of the oldest stone house in Warren. Built in 1799 by Benjamin Sackett from granite quarried just north of the homestead, it was inherited by Sackett's granddaughter Emily Sackett and her husband, J.H. Comstock. It remained in the family for more than a century. In 1926 Ludlow Melius purchased it and called it Reverie Farm. Eventually it became the home and studio of artist, Cleve Grey and his father-in-law, Alexander Liberman.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
The fourth school district in Warren was the Northeast which began east of Cornwall Road and included homes in the valley of the west branch of the Shepaug. This painting in the collection of the Warren Historical Society by Herbert E. Abrams depicts the intersection of Melius and Hardscrabble Roads in the latter half of the 20th Century.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
The Fractured District was located in the farthest northeast corner of Warren and borders Cornwall to the north and Litchfield to the east. Before the Shepaug was dammed it was far more accessible to the rest of Warren. Children from this district went to school with Cornwall children which was probably how it got its name. The Guild family was the principal family of the district. Jeremiah Guild was taken prisoner by the British during the Revolution and upon his release purchased 150 acres in the Fractured District where he manufactured charcoal.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Warm wishes of the season from the Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
The last stop (rather fitting) in Center District is the old Warren Center Cemetery.
While the earliest grave is dated 1755, according to a 1934 newspaper article there may have been many other earlier interments whose stones have been removed.
The history of Warren can be traced through those tombstones: the Revolution, the life of the longest serving minister, the Gold Rush and the Civil War, to name but a few.
There are centenarians buried there, slaves and child brides and the WHS is proud to announce that very soon an interactive map will be available which will link names to plot locations and monument inscriptions.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Holiday on the Hill 2019. Thanks to everyone who stopped by, shared a cookie or had a sip of our Smoking Bishop. Special thanks to the Warren Library and Louise Manteuffel who made our table look extra special!