Warren was settled in 1737 as part of the Town of Kent.  In 1750 a separate ecclesiastical society called the Society of East Greenwich was established and a church was founded in 1756. In 1786 Warren was incorporated as a separate town.

 

The entrance of the Warren Historical Society.
Please visit us at 7 Sackett Hill Road. The entrance is in the rear of the building.
The office is open on Tuesdays from 1pm-4pm and by appointment.

 

Glimpses into Warren’s almost 225 years of history are captured in the museum collection. Photos, objects, diaries and genealogies tell the stories of Warren’s families, homes, business and role in American history.

 

The Brick School and One-Room Schooling
2 PM Sunday,
February 9 at Lower Meeting Room
Town Hall
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The Brick School also called North School has the distinction of being the single-room schoolhouse with the longest record of continuous operation in the State of Connecticut.

Discover, celebrate and preserve Warren’s History for the benefit of its citizens and surrounding communities through its collections, programs and exhibits.

 

Follow us on Facebook to keep up with our ever changing events and news regarding the Warren Historical Society.

 

Join because you love Warren. Donate because every piece of history we save expands our knowledge of those who came before. Volunteer because it’s the only way you can touch the past and reach the future. Become a member today!

 

Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
In these times “deforestation” is a scary word. In the early 1800s it was just a part of making charcoal to make steel. Here is a view of Lake Waramaug before the trees grew back. You can also follow us on Instagram at @WarrenCtHistoricalSociety #1850s #WarrrenCt #lakewaramaug #warrencthistoricalsociety #ironsmelting #charcoal #theViewBackThen
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Nothing was scarier than being excommunicated back in 1814. Unless you are Dilley Curtiss. Our Dilley wrote a 4 page open letter to the Reverend and Deacons of the Church, quoting past sermons, and the Lord, Jesus Christ, about the importance of not judging people by appearances, and to get the facts straight. She also calls out her neighbors for gossiping about her to her aging father and to her husband. She never outright states her “crime”, but she defends her actions as not being equal to theft or murder.
You can visit Dilley Curtiss in the Old Burying Ground on Cornwall Rd. Use our digitized map https://warrencthistoricalsociety.org/history/digitized-map-of-the-old-burying-ground/
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Happy Birthday to Kitty Curtis (see our post from March)
She would have been 150 years old today!
When she turned 101, she received birthday cards from Congresswoman Ella T. Grasso and Richard M. Nixon.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
This past week in Warren’s history was the birthday of Major Eleazer Curtiss, (Sept 23rd, 1736 – Oct 1st, 1788). A Major in the Revolutionary War and a member of the convention that ratified the Constitution of the United States at Hartford, Ct. It was at his request that when the Society of East Greenwich incorporated as a town that it was named Warren to honor his favorite General who fell at Bunker Hill. Family lore also has it that his son, Eleazer the 4th, who accompanied the Major to the Battle of Danbury, caught General Wooster as he fell wounded from his horse.
Major Curtiss died at age 52. From his will, stating that he was of sound mind, but failing body, we don't know the cause of death. But Oliver Wolcott Jr, who later became the 24th governor of Connecticut, was the probate judge that officiated that will.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
From the vault; Warren was a farming town from it’s beginning. So how did you keep all those cows straight as to which cow belonged to which farmer. This book was used by the Town Clerk to record the notches cut into a cow’s ear to identify the owner.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Josephine Vorisek would have been around 10 years old when she made this seating plan of the Brick School over 100 years ago, giving us a glimpse of school life. One hopes that the students would get to rotate their seats to be closer to the wood stove in winter sessions.