Warren was settled in 1737 as part of the Town of Kent.  In 1750 a separate ecclesiastical society called the Society of East Greenwich was established and a church was founded in 1756. In 1786 Warren was incorporated as a separate town.

 

The entrance of the Warren Historical Society.
Please visit us at 7 Sackett Hill Road. The entrance is in the rear of the building.
The office is open from 9 – 12 pm on Mondays and by appointment.

 

Glimpses into Warren’s almost 225 years of history are captured in the museum collection. Photos, objects, diaries and genealogies tell the stories of Warren’s families, homes, business and role in American history.

 

The Brick School and One-Room Schooling
2 PM Sunday,
February 9 at Lower Meeting Room
Town Hall
Read More…

The Brick School also called North School has the distinction of being the single-room schoolhouse with the longest record of continuous operation in the State of Connecticut.

Discover, celebrate and preserve Warren’s History for the benefit of its citizens and surrounding communities through its collections, programs and exhibits.

 

Follow us on Facebook to keep up with our ever changing events and news regarding the Warren Historical Society.

 

Join because you love Warren. Donate because every piece of history we save expands our knowledge of those who came before. Volunteer because it’s the only way you can touch the past and reach the future. Become a member today!

 

Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
An old Chinese curse says “may you live in interesting times.” Well, these times are interesting for sure…and uncertain and confusing. You are living through a historic moment! In the future, people in Warren and elsewhere will try to understand what it was like to be alive during the Covid-19 pandemic. The Warren Historical Society has prepared an interactive document to help capture what it's like to live during these "interesting times." Have a look. Maybe make it a family project. https://warrencthistoricalsociety.org/covid-19/
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Over the next few weeks I'd like to explore Warren's relation to its earliest history. Board member, Craig Nelson, has generously shared his knowledge and photographs relevant to prehistoric Warren.
Between 12,500 and 13,000 humans began to visit northwest Connecticut mostly as winter visitors after hunting caribou in VT and NH. Bear-sized beaver were also hunted for their pelts and their fatty tails. The only remains of this population are stone tools and projectile points. The point on the left is about 13,000 years old while the full point is about 12,500.
Paleo people lived in northwest Connecticut for about 4000 years. Europeans have been here for about 280.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Like the North River District, there is almost nothing left to mark the existence of the South River District. In the 19th Century is was a bustling area with Woodville and Petersville anchoring two commercial districts. There were several mills, a post office even its own doctor.
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
The deadline for completed applications for the Warren Historical Society scholarship is midnight tonight, May 1. https://warrencthistoricalsociety.org/our-events/scholarship-information/
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
Pond or Lake District
The Beeman family were the primary land owners in the Lake District and before 1800 Thomas Beeman owned over 2000 acres.
It was the Beeman family who originally owned the clover mill on the Sucker Brook Lake Road although Minor Strong became its most prominent owner. Clover seed remains a valuable commodity because it enriches the forage of sheep and cattle.
Understandably, recreation became the primary commercial enterprise of the Lake District. In the 19th Century the Martha Washington Tea House welcomed visitors at the intersection of Lake and North Shore Roads.
Martha Washington Tea Room
Warren Historical Society
Warren Historical Society
We could really use your help. Our digitized map of the Old Warren Center Cemetery is live on our website https://www.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=90463b57a3fd41e5b767ad9fe551b77d&extent=-8165372.9615%2C5123020.6515%2C-8165014.6629%2C5123228.4647%2C102100, but it is a work in progress. There are graves still unphotographed. In fewer than five minutes you can capture five monuments. We’ll give you the names and locations. It’s a great social distancing project.