Tude Tanguay


In preparation for installing the new LED message board, the Warren town crew uncovered this memorial stone on the green just north of the Warren Historical Society.
Tude Tanguay was a musician and played with a group called the Mountaineers. This is not Mr. Tanguay’s final resting place. He is buried in the New Cemetery in Warren. We would welcome more information about this interesting Warren resident and his musical career.

Playing the fiddle this unorthodox way, bearded Tude Tanguay calls the turns.

10 thoughts on “Tude Tanguay

  1. Larry says:

    I spoke with Tude Jr. a few weeks ago and asked him what the stone was for. He said his dad was a proud supporter of Warren and a tree had been planted in his name upon his passing. The stone was to mark his service to the town. Apparently, the tree passed, as well. The stone was moved several feet from its original location and given a 90 degree turn in order to accommodate the wiring for the new sign. Now that I think about it, I wonder when that sign will be lit up?

  2. Kalli Shevzov says:

    hi-
    I’d love to provide information about Tude Tanguay. He was my father, and I remember when this stone was placed, and if my memory serves me correctly, it is across from the Warren church, and below the Town Hall, so the location overlooks the town green. He lived an interesting life, and while people may remember him best for his fiddle playing, he left an important legacy to Warren and surrounding towns in the form of encouraging the preservation of open spaces. The old 4H Camp which became Warren Woods, and the town park on the north end of Lake Waramaug were two areas he worked quietly but diligently to preserve as open spaces. Glad to see this stone has been uncovered.

  3. Pamela Gilpin Stowe says:

    Tude was a good friend of my father, Jimmy Gilpin, fiddle player of the Pioneer Trio. My Dad had much respect for Tude Tanguay and loved his unorthodox style of playing the violin / fiddle. As a kid, I remember watching Tude play his fiddle while placed under his legs. Tude was a person, with whom just the mention of his name, made my Dad smile.

    Pamela Gilpin Stowe

  4. Pamela Gilpin Stowe says:

    Tude was a good friend of my father, Jimmy Gilpin, fiddle player of the Pioneer Trio. My Dad had much respect for Tude Tanguay and loved his unorthodox style of playing the violin / fiddle. As a kid, I remember watching Tude play his fiddle while placed under his legs.

    Pamela Gilpin Stowe

  5. ROYAN BARTLEY says:

    Tude was my Grandpa. Even though he died when I was three, I have such wonderful memories of a house full of live music! Thank you for placing the memorial so it doesn’t get lost again.

    Sincerely,
    Royan Herbert Bartley

    • Ellen Paul says:

      Dear Royan Batley,
      Tude was such a feature in Warren. Besides the memorial next to the Community Center, there is Fiddler’s Pond, the centerpiece of Warren Woods. We would welcome your memories of him. Our oral history committee has him on a list of those we want to commmeorate.

  6. Elaine Wallace Kelsey says:

    In the late 40’s and early 50’s I saw Tude frequently when He was employed by the Ct. State Parks along with my stepfather, Nate Strong. When bothered by a buzzing wasp he would swat at the offending insect and plea “Leave me bee” or lean momentarily on his scythe and query “Think you’ll ever amount to anything, Lainie?” In addition to playing the fiddle under his legs and behind his back he would call for a female volunteer to sit on his lap on stage. Once ensconced she would awkwardly hold the bow while Tude maneuvered the fiddle itself and uncannily a recognizable tune would emerge. When we were teenagers, my sister Pat and I gave a party held in the barn at Housatonic Park attended by dozens of HVRHS students. Tude provided the music and entertainment and held everyone in thrall. I don’t recall any exchange of money for his labor. Given his generous nature, instinct tells me that he would summarily refuse any form of payment.

  7. Louise H Fillinger says:

    Louise Tanguay Fillinger- Another of my father’s favorite projects was restoring the Appalachian trail through that area. We spent many a day stomping around in the woods marking the trail. He knew the woods like the back of his hand and could tell you where to find every native wild flower. Including the beautiful but very rare yellow lady slipper. He never let us pick them though.

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